History

History

The sport of Pilot Gig Racing has evolved over a number of years from what was once a way if earning a living. Throughout the history of the pilot gig there have been heroic rescues, jobs in pilotage and now the rapidly expanding sport.

Taken from a traditional design, the gigs that are constructed today follow the original specifications as laid down by the Peters family in the form of the gig ‘Treffry’ (1838), which is still actively rowed by the Newquay Rowing Club. Over 200 years ago William Peters working in his yard at Polvarth, St. Mawes, Cornwall would have probably given little thought to the future of his craft. But for us today they are an historical asset, a testament to the skill of the Peters family. Built from narrow leaf (ideally) Cornish elm and inspected at least three times during their build by the Association Standards Officer, the modern gig is a speedy and seaworthy craft.

(Source: http://www.cpga.co.uk)